The wall of GDPR

One year has passed since GDPR was implemented in the European Economic Area. Much has been said about whether the regulations successfully protects our privacy or not. But it is quite clear that we cannot browse the web as freely as before. Some information is unavailable to us after GDPR.

GDPR – the General Data Protection Regulation – was implemented to force businesses to take more care in handling our personal data. The cause is noble, and GDPR is mostly welcome in my opinion. But as a radio amateur trying to visit websites outside the EEA, GDPR is somewhat of a hassle. Many websites literally blocks access for visitors from within the EEA instead of adapting to the new regulations.

Isolated inside EEA

It seems that GDPR has built a giant wall around us. On a regular basis, as I try to read news from overseas I am greeted with messages such as this one from wearecentralpa.com:

Our European visitors are important to us.

This site is currently unavailable to visitors from the European Economic Area while we work to ensure your data is protected in accordance with applicable EU laws.

I have to admit that it frustrates me. I clicked that link because I found the title interesting, and I wanted to read that article. Immediately I curse the GDPR for isolating us from the outside world.

Is GDPR the problem?

But is GDPR really the problem? No, of course it is not. The company presenting me with this blank, ignorant page has chosen not to comply with the regulations implemented to protect my personal data. It is not GDPRs fault. This is all on the company. Either they use their customers data in a way that does not comply with GDPR, or they do not value their customers enough to care. Either way I do not want to support them.

This far you may come and no farther. -But do I want to?

It has been a full year, and these companies have not yet bothered to take the small, necessary steps needed to comply with GDPR. They have not done their part to assure their customers that our data is protected. Shame on them. I found their article interesting. Now I don’t feel like reading it anymore.

” Our European visitors are important to us.” I don’t think so.

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